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What does candy say about the death of his dog?

Here is what the text says: “I ought to of shot that dog myself, George. I shouldn’t ought to of let no stranger shoot my dog.”

Why do you think candy allowed Carlson to kill his dog should he have done it himself or refused to have it done?

Why do you think Candy allowed Carlson to kill his dog? Should he have done it himself, or refused to have it done? Candy allowed Carlson to kill his dog because Slim agreed with Carlson. Slim is the “prince of the ranch” so he and his decisions is respected.

What Candy says about his dog?

“Carl’s right, Candy. That dog ain’t no good to himself. When Slim offers Candy a puppy and says of the old dog, “That dog ain’t no good to himself. I wisht somebody’d shoot me if I got old an’ a cripple,” Slim presents an important symbolism behind Candy’s old dog.

Why does candy say I ought to of shot that dog myself George I shouldn’t ought to of let no stranger shoot my dog?

Later, in a conversation with George, Candy says that he should have put down the dog himself. He regrets letting a stranger do it. Candy feels this way because he has been with the dog since the dog was a puppy.

Why did Candy take his dog’s death so hard?

Candy says he should have shot his old dog himself rather than having allowed Carlson to kill it because he feels that he should have been man enough to have realized that the poor dog suffered and not kept him for selfish reasons.

What does George say after Lennie kills Curley’s wife?

At the end of the novella, when George realizes that Lennie has killed Curley’s wife, he tells Candy that their plans for the farm will no longer happen. George is not surprised by this: “’I think I knowed we’d never do her. He usta liked to hear about it so much I got to thinking we would’” (94).

Where does Lennie run after he kills Curley’s wife?

Where does Lennie go right after he kills Curley’s wife? Lennie ran to go hide in the brush by the river, where George told him to.