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The Internet has many places to ask questions about anything imaginable and find past answers on almost everything.

What is it like living with ADHD?

The symptoms include an inability to focus, being easily distracted, hyperactivity, poor organization skills, and impulsiveness. Not everyone who has ADHD has all these symptoms. They vary from person to person and tend to change with age.

Is an ADHD child considered special needs?

ADHD is not considered to be a learning disability. It can be determined to be a disability under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), making a student eligible to receive special education services.

How does TV Cause ADHD?

The bottom line on TV: Cancel the guilt trip. Plenty of kids who watch little or no TV are diagnosed with ADHD, and an abundance of evidence points to a genetic connection. The researchers themselves stated that, based on their findings, TV does not cause ADHD.

Do video games worsen ADHD?

The bottom line. While video games do not cause ADHD, they can exacerbate symptoms. Those with ADHD may be more susceptible to developing a gaming addiction as a coping mechanism to better deal with their disorder. However, parents working together with their children to address the issue can lead to positive results.

Do Phones Cause ADHD?

One study found that children who make calls and play games on cell phones were at increased risk for ADHD. However, it is possible that children may play more games on their phone because they already have symptoms of ADHD, such as inattention and hyper-focus.

Can too much tech cause ADHD symptoms in your child?

Absolutely not. But these activities may cause symptoms that are similar to ADHD, even though they can’t cause ADHD itself,” Dr. Manos says. He explains that ADHD is a genetic disposition characterized by specific hyperactive and impulsive behaviors involving physical changes in the brain.

Can social media give you ADHD?

A study published this week suggests it’s possible, while a professor of behavioral health says she has doubts. Maggie Sibley, PhD, has read the study and says the young people in the study were reporting greater distractibility related to their digital media usage, not a development of ADHD symptoms.